The man in the mirror

We live in a vain, narcissistic and selfie-obsessed world. We have all had to step around people blocking sidewalks and paths taking pictures of themselves. We all have that FB friend who posts pictures of every meal and of every stop they make. I know a woman who has no less than thousands of selfies on her phone, she is constantly picking up her phone and snapping a shot. The worse thing is she is over 40 and still making “duck” faces. Ladies, please. You need to know when you are too old to do that.

I never caught the selfie bug. I hate pictures of myself so I NEVER take selfies. In fact, I dive into bushes to avoid being photographed at all. Photos of me are rare because I just don’t like how I look and how I feel.

They’re like mirrors.

I don’t look at them either.

Mirrors are not a marvel of invention. It’s just glass, made from sand. Yet they wield an incredible power. They can force a person who looks into it to not see the whole picture but to only focus on the flaws. The most beautiful woman in the world could look in the mirror and immediately focus on a tiny birthmark on her forehead. And that birthmark troubles her, and brings on an insecurity so powerful that she is rendered unable to see her beauty.

Of course, there is another reason why one might not like mirrors. They just don’t like the person looking back at them.

I recently had lunch with a dear friend and the “man (or woman) in the mirror” came up. I haphazardly mentioned it in conversation and my she immediately teared up. Confused, I patiently waited for her to enlighten me as to the cause of her tears. As it turns out when she was younger (pre-puberty) she had Alopecia. Yup, at the age in which kids are the most cruel she was completely bald. This wonderful young lady, I have no reason to believe that she was any less wonderful then because she’s pretty damned amazing now, was so traumatized that she wouldn’t look in a mirror. I let her tell her tale of bullying and general harassment and let her compose herself. Once it was appropriate I offered up that I was speaking more about looking in the mirror and not liking the person you are.

“It was both” she said. The bullying made her not like herself. The bullies had done their damage.

She fortunately grew hair as a teenager but it wasn’t a magic elixir. The scars remain.

The tragedy is that her condition, and the subsequent bullying did far more damage than just mere insecurities about her appearance. It massively affected her entire self image, physical, psychological and emotional. To the point that she didn’t want to look in the mirror. She is mostly over it, but it’s still bubbling under the surface. 0

Despite having blogged about this topic before, our conversation made me revisit it.

For the longest time I made it a strict policy to not look at any reflective surface except the mirror while shaving. Partially due to a fear of a massive blood loss from a shaving cut, also that for the longest time I hated how I looked. All I saw was an overweight guy with several jowls, pale complexion and a flabby physique. I also knew that even if I was able to overcome all of those physical things, I still didn’t want to look at my reflection because I didn’t like who I was as a person. The same with photos, which I would rather dive into a shrubbery head first than be caught by the camera lense.

I believe, hell I know, that there are some seriously morally reprehensible people who have no problem looking at their reflection. I also know that there are plenty of people with physical flaws, some downright unattractive, that can look in the mirror effortlessly. I have never been either one of them. I envy them. I have always been blessed/cursed with a heightened self-awareness masquerading as a moral compass. I had the wonderful skill to be markedly aware that I was not on the right path morally and spiritually yet have no desire to work on it.

Until one day when I forced myself to stand there and take a good, hard look. I did an inventory of what I could change about my appearance and what I couldn’t. That was the easy part. The belly could be vanquished by better choices in food, a gym membership and a little self-discipline. The pasty complexion could be remedied by going outside instead of sleeping until noon. The sunken eyes, well a sharp reduction in my alcohol consumption was all that was required. The receding hairline and bad teeth, well I would just have to live with those. Again, as hard as it was for a person who wrapped in a towel as I passed a mirror after showering, it was still the easy part. Liking the guy that I did see as a person proved to be far more difficult.

Self-examination, if done properly, requires a keen and unflinching eye and you need a goal. You have to be a Forensic Accountant to do it right, for the inevitable outcome is that you are going to find things that have to be brought to the boss’s attention regardless of how well they are going to be received. When I turned my powers of observation on myself I found out more than I wanted and not much of it was good. But I was determined to do a deep dive and really, for once and for all, improve myself and be the person I wanted to be. It was exactly as hard as I thought it would be. But through brutal honesty and an unflinching eye I learned what I had to do.

My behavior, my attitude, my sense of self, my humor and my relationships with those close to me all needed a veritable shitload of work. It started with my children. I stopped fighting with them and reminded myself that I’m supposed to be the adult in the room. I stopped fighting with my wife because I’d have more luck wrestling a spoon from a fat lady at the Cheesecake Factory than I would winning an argument or changing a viewpoint with her. I started being nicer in general to everybody. I became a better listener. I had known all of these things were my Achilles heel and once I started I did it all at once. But it wasn’t until I got really sick and hit rock bottom (around the time that I started this blog) that it all fell into place. No longer the driving force that I once was in my children’s life that I was; no longer the “go-to” indispensable man at work; no longer the breadwinner and backbone of my family I realized that I would have to find a new purpose. I am happy to report that life showed it to me in due time. I have been willingly forced into a life of altruism; volunteerism, charity, Freemasonry and part-time impromptu amateur motivational speaker. I even occasionally serve as an inspiration to someone who thought that they hit rock bottom. Until they heard my story.

I almost like who I have become with a few minor exceptions.

My friend that I had lunch with did have difficulty finally staring at her own image and accepting what she saw. At the end of the day she realized that those cruel, heartless pricks that made her feel bad about herself didn’t have any power over her except the insults. They didn’t know her, the person she would become and how awesome she is. She is now a happily married, independently successful businesswoman and an amazing, funny and caring person. She wins. But nevertheless, she still had to deal with both issues I have spoken of, not liking her reflection over the physical and the emotional.

Me, I had a longer journey than she did, but I got there. The same way we all make major steps forward.

I waited until I couldn’t any longer.

29 thoughts on “The man in the mirror”

  1. Very powerful and insightful article, Billy! As someone who was horribly bullied for six long years in school (middle and high school), this resonates with me so much! For years, I didn’t like myself either and it had a negative effect on my life.

    When I finally grew sick of being unhappy, I started doing a lot of reading on positive thinking and the law of attraction and learned that perhaps it was my outlook that was holding me back. I then started catching ever negative thought and replacing it with a positive one.

    It wasn’t easy. In fact, it took several years to make the change but today, I’m so glad I did! I’m now a happy, confident person and I love myself. Because I.love myself I’m able to love others more efficiently!

    I’m so sorry you were bullied. No one deserves it. I’m so proud that you took the initiative to change your mindset and realized that you were never defined by the way you were being treated!

    May you continue to be happy! Blessings!

    Scheduled for reblog on Chateau Cherie.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Those childhood scars are deep, and never completely disappear. We can overcome them and lead happy and productive lives, but they linger below the surface, can pop up unexpectedly, and bring us right back to that awful time…….never had an issue with mirrors, not that I’m always looking at them. Mom was good for my ego

    Like

  3. I’ve never liked mirrors or having my photo taken. If I go out, I’ll check I look OK and that the skirt isn’t tucked into the knickers kind of thing, but I don’t fiddle with my hair or wear makeup. What you see is what you get, and the only false bit about me is The Precious after my mastectomy last year, but I feel confident without it anyway.
    I had my confidence knocked at school by the staff as well as a few classmates, but really hit rock bottom in 1988. I came through it with the help of good GP and understanding boss, left the relationship in 1989, and since meeting Hubby a couple of months afterwards, he’s brought out the best in me. Life is good, and I have a good man to share it with.
    We have to like ourselves for who we are, and don’t need mirrors for that.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I was never a confident teenager, and when my first marriage failed, that knocked some more stuffing out of me. The next relationship nearly killed me, he drained my spirit, self respect, and sense of self worth.
        I rebuilt my life in 1988, got out of the relationship in 1989, meeting Hubby two months later. At least I’ve felt good about myself for half my life (I’ll be 64 in May)
        I haven’t been following you that long really, but from what I’ve read, I think you’re a damn decent human being.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. You have a great story and I can confidently say that you seem very comfortable in your skin. That eluded me for a very long time
        And thank you for the kind words.
        I so enjoy this blog but my readership is way way down so readers and friends like you are a treasure

        Like

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