Let’s hit the course… a Mike Valentine tale

this is a continuation of a post from last week. You can catch up here.

His brief moment of warmth towards Tracey over with, Mike Valentine vividly recalled how much she had fought him when he was hired. Tracey thought that she should be Sales Manager and for a while refused to even come into his office. She thought it should be hers. Little did she know that he was partially hired to “reign her in” and “get rid of her cleanly” if possible. It needed to be done. She had a well documented history of insubordination and she was so disliked by staff and customers alike that other auctions would thank Mike for having her, that she was driving business to them. Mike never lost sight of that when dealing with her. She was either going to get in step with his way, or she would be gone. Two years had already passed and he was no closer to getting rid of her than he was but he had some great success in curbing some of her bad habits.

Dismissing her from his mind, he again focused on his emails and his upcoming day. He heard the door of the office next to him bang and he realized that Bob was in. He grabbed the flyer for the golf tournament and went in to say good morning. With very little convincing, Mike left the office with a check request for 500.00 to buy a foursome and a list of potential dealers to invite. He had to move. The tournament was in 2 weeks. He had to make some calls. It took all of one hour to secure the foursome. He invited one active dealer rep and his owner, as an award for regular business. He then invited a dealer whose business he had been trying to secure for some time.

Mike was excited for the first time in what seemed forever. Golf tournaments were the biggest perk in sales while also serving as the ultimate means of securing clients. Mike constantly battled ringing phones and interrupting employees are the worst when visiting customers. On the golf course you have between 6 and 8 hours, depending on the size of the tournament, and you have their full attention for the entire time. Plus, and perhaps most importantly, it was a day off from work with pay and an expense account. As he walked back to his office he felt a spring in his step.

For the next 2 hours Mike finished his morning routine. He called his reps, discussed their game plans for the day, offered advice or suggestions as needed, asked if assistance was needed with any customers and generally made it known that he was paying attention. When he was satisfied that the reps were on the right track he finished his emails and prepared for the 11 AM Managers meeting.

Preparation was ingrained in Mike Valentine’s DNA. It wasn’t enough for him to know what was going on. He insisted on being prepared for any question, no matter how far out of left field it may come from. His manager had come to expect this from him, his memory of tiny yet important details had earned him the affectionate moniker of “Rain Man”, after the iconic 80’s movie. It was difficult to maintain this level of attention to detail but it was what, as his father always preached, “makes one man stand out more than another.” His dad didn’t say that as a statement of exceptionalism towards his boy, but instead to reinforce his belief that a man’s achievements in life define him.

At 10:55 Mike, feeling accomplished and prepared, folded up his manifold and made his way through the office to the stairs. As he started the ascent he felt winded after only a few steps. He paused, tried to catch his breath and not convey his condition to the coworkers walking by him on the stairs. He looked at his phone to pretend that he was reading an email while he caught his breath. Was he hung over? Was he dehydrated? Was he just out of shape? These questions danced through his head as he regained his breath. He finished the flight of stairs, paused outside of the already full conference room and waited until he wasn’t puffing before he went inside. When he walked in his GM sarcastically thanked him for joining the party. His co-managers snickered in unison.

The meeting consisted of Mike the GM, Bob the AGM, Mike, the Fleet lease manager, Office manager, Reconditioning shop manager and the Body Shop manager. Mike was in a decent mood and the meeting was smooth if not boring. Mike had little patience for the details of the margins, collection policy changes and oversight matters. He only cared if they were bringing in, and selling more cars than they were 1 year ago at that time. That was his job. Volume. But he listened along and chimed in when asked for his input.
He didn’t feel well and he feared that his face was showing it.
As the meeting turned to the Office Manager on his right, Mike was suddenly overcome by a sharp, stabbing pain in his left side. It hurt so instantly and intensely that Mike yelped loudly in pain. Not wanting to make a scene, he struggled to get up from his chair and make his way to the door. Two feet before he reached the door, his co-workers bleating at him as the waves of pain tore through him, Mike Valentine collapsed on the floor of the conference room.

More later…

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